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High Uintas Bookshelf

A High Uintas Bookshelf

In this column we’ll list 2-4 interesting articles, books or the like that have caught our attention. They aren’t necessarily recent or recently read-- sort of a random compilation. Within a year, hopefully, we’ll have an established and detailed reading list. It won’t be complete without your additions. Please send suggestions and a descriptive sentence or two.

Sagebrush Country. Philip Fradkin. Alfred Knopf, N.Y., 1989. A book about the Uintas. And a good one! Fradkin hikes the crest of the Uintas and weaves together the history of northeastern Utah and southwestern Wyoming. The Uintas represented both a magnet and a deterrent to development of this region. This is a unique and very good book, one which should be read by all who are involved in trying to understand how we see wild landscapes. There are two or three stories about Dick Carter in the book-- one vivid story about the attempt to shove him off Burr Point on the Dirty Devil River as well as a number of stories about Carter and the early wilderness fight to preserve the High Uintas.Wonderful Life (The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History.) Stephen Jay Gould. W.W. Norton and Co., N.Y., l989. Gould’s challenging thesis is simple: life is remarkable, it is wonderful and is simply contingent on chance! If the tape of creation were played again, what we see today would simply not exist.Should Trees Have Standing? Christopher Stone. Avon Books, N.Y., l974. Short and profound. One of the compelling pieces of conservation literature. In many ways it set in motion the modern conservation movement.

In the Spring 1998 issue of Wild Earth, Dave Foreman, writes a wonderful column, "Around the Campfire," in which he pleads that we replace the word environmentalist with conservationist or host of other words that tie directly to wild earth. He implores wilderness supporters to "Never, never, never use the E word!" You can read the article," Etymology and Environmental Problems" to determine for yourself the vision of Foreman!


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